Arts & culture

There are numerous sources of information on life as a LGBT(I) person in the different countries where Denmark are engaged in developmental partnerships: Magazines, references to book titles, film clips or references to these. And at LGBTnet.dk we have started to include these in our resources. Read about for example the newest issue of Qzine - African’s only magazine of LGBTI arts and culture. Find them in our extensive database of resources.

Q zine 10

Latin America

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In some of the countries on the Latin America & Caribbean Continent same-sex relations are illegal and LGBT persons face discrimination and violation of fundamental rights.


As of May 2012 homosexual acts are illegal in 11 countries, mostly the Caribbean countries.












 


Bolivia

The Constitution of Bolivia, implemented in February 2009, prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The 2010 law against racism and all forms of discrimination includes sexual orientation and gender identity as prohibited bases for discrimination in access to public and private services and to establishments serving the public.

Read more: Bolivia

Colombia

LGBT rights in Colombia have progressed since consensual homosexual activity was decriminalized in 1980 with amendments to the Criminal Code. Between February 2007 and April 2008 three rulings of the Constitutional Court granted registered same-sex couples the same pension, social security and property rights as for registered heterosexual couples.

Read more: Colombia

El Salvador

Both male and female same-sex sexual activity is legal in El Salvador, but same-sex couples and households headed by same-sex couples are not eligible for the same legal protections available to opposite-sex married couples. A national law does exist to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, but it is rarely enforced. Polls show high levels of prejudice directed at LGBT people, and there are many reports of anti-gay harassment and bias motivated violence.

On 4 May 2010, President Mauricio Funes issued a presidential decree banning discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity in the public service.

Read more: El Salvador

Guatemala

Information on the conditions for LGBT people in Guatemala is very scarce

 

In Guatemala there is no legal recognition for same-sex couples and same-sex couples and households headed by same-sex couples are not eligible for the same legal protections available to opposite-sex married couples.

According to a July 2010 poll, 85% of the country's population opposes same-sex marriage, while 12% supports it and 3% are unsure. Therefore discrimination and hate crimes still go unpunished, especially crimes towards the transgender community.

Read more: Guatemala

Honduras

Male and female same-sex sexual activity is legal in Honduras, but same-sex couples and households headed by same-sex couples are not eligible for the same legal protections available to opposite-sex married couples. Both same-sex marriages and adoption by same-sex couples have been constitutionally banned since 2005. The Constitution stipulates that citizens have the right to establish and associate with political parties and interest groups,yet initial efforts to register a LGBT-rights group have been met with government opposition or extended delay.

Read more: Honduras

Nicaragua

Both male and female same-sex sexual activity is legal in Nicaragua, but same-sex couples and households headed by same-sex couples are not eligible for the same legal protections available to opposite-sex married couples. In November 2007, a new Penal Code was drafted and since 1 March 2008, same-sex sexual activity has been legal by a new Penal Code.

Read more: Nicaragua

Peru

LGBT people in Peru may face legal challenges not experienced by non-LGBT residents. Same-sex sexual activity among consenting adults are legal. An exception was previously made for all military and police personnel, who could be punished with between 60 days to 20 years imprisonment or discharge from the forces. However, in December 2009, the Supreme Court of Peru ruled that homosexual orientation or engaging in homosexual sex cannot be an impediment to membership of the police forces and the military.

Read more: Peru

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