Country Reports

Information on the conditions for LGBTI minorities in specific countries from global human rights organizations and other sources.

Documents

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My way, your way, or the right way? The Yogyakarta principles: a kenyan interpretation My way, your way, or the right way? The Yogyakarta principles: a kenyan interpretation

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Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 2.11 MB
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my_way_picture_2Rights Law and the LGBTI Community in Kenya (2010).

An interpretation of how the Yogyakarta principles are applicable in a Kenyan context including case stories of LGBTI people. The GKT (Gay Kenyan trust) has reformulated the legal language of the Yogyakarta principles into a language that is easy for every Kenyan to understand. The result is a simple and clear explanatiion of what LGBTI rights are. That they are neither "Special Rights", nor "New Rights". They are basic human rights. GKT urges the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) to endorse the Yogyakarta Principles and/or this local presentation of the Principles in public forums and to sponsor training and awareness?raising activities.

They hunt us down for fun. Discrimination and police violence against transgender women in Kuwait They hunt us down for fun. Discrimination and police violence against transgender women in Kuwait

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Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 1.25 MB
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Human Rights Watch Report (2009).

Until 2007 transgender women in Kuwait were able to circulate freely, secure employment, access public health care, and live with minimal interference from police.

That changed when Kuwait’s National Assembly voted to amend the country’s penal code: A previously generic public decency law now stipulated that anyone “imitating the opposite sex in any way” would face one year in prison, a large fine, or both. The amendment did not criminalize any specific behavior or act, but rather physical appearance, the acceptable parameters of which were to be arbitrarily defined by individual police. These provisions have created a sea-change in the lives of Kuwaiti transgender women. Many have since become victims of abuse by police, who often take advantage of the law to harass, sexually assault, and arbitrarily arrest them.

Human Rights Watch urge Kuwait to take immediate steps to investigate allegations of torture, prosecute those responsible, and implement working mechanisms to curb future abuses. In order to comply with its obligations under international law, Kuwait should impose an immediate moratorium on arrests under the amended article 198 and repeal the amendment, which in and of itself is vague and overbroad, failing to define the elements of the crime with any specificity, and as a result has been applied in an arbitrary manner.

Forbidden: Institutionalizing Discrimination Against Gays and Lesbians in Burundi Forbidden: Institutionalizing Discrimination Against Gays and Lesbians in Burundi

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Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 476.76 kB
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BurundiBurundian LGBT people were devastated in November 2008, when the National Assembly voted in favor of adding an article to the proposed new Criminal Code that would penalize same-sex relations between consenting adults. Human Rights Watch (2009).

Burundian lawyers and politicians, along with international experts, had spent two years revising the old criminal code, which dated to 1981, but the National Assembly’s human rights commission added the anti-homosexuality provision at the last minute. Human Rights Watch teamed up with a photographer to create portraits of ten of these young people, many of whom feel that their very identities have been rendered criminal by Burundi’s new law. HRW hope that others will draw lessons from these narratives and will work to restore the rights of LGBT people.

Behind the mask - The voice of Africas LGBT community Behind the mask - The voice of Africas LGBT community

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Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 02/05/2013
Filesize: Unknown
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Through journalism and activism, Behind the mask provides reliable information and initiates dialogue about LGBTI issues in Africa to ensure that human rights are recognized as indivisible and are guaranteed for everyone.

Coming out in the Kingdom: Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Cambodia Coming out in the Kingdom: Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Cambodia

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Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 1.08 MB
Downloads: 1124

Report from the LGBT Rights Project by the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (2010).

cambodjaHomosexuality is not illegal in Cambodia and there are no anti-gay religious traditions. However, LGBT persons in Cambodia still face discrimination and/or abuse from family members, employers, and police.

As a result of differences in language and culture, the concept of ‘homosexuality’ as understood in the West is not necessarily directly transferable and understandable in the Cambodian context. Rather, the Cambodian understanding of sexuality is derived from concepts of gender, character and personality. The focus on these character traits and outwardly visible characteristics instead of sexual orientation means that many Cambodians who are homosexual do not identify themselves as such. Among Buddhists, there is a general disposition to tolerate homosexuality. Because Cambodian culture is predominantly Buddhist, homosexuality, whilst seen as an oddity, does not attract the kind of aggressive reaction as can be seen in Christian or Muslim cultures. King Father Norodom Sihanouk has expressed public support for LGBT people but the views of other politicians have been mixed. The challenges faced by LGBT people in Cambodia have not been acknowledged by the Royal Government of Cambodia ("RGC") and do not seem to feature on the RGC agenda at all.

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