Country Reports

Information on the conditions for LGBTI minorities in specific countries from global human rights organizations and other sources.

Documents

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My way, your way, or the right way? The Yogyakarta principles: a kenyan interpretation My way, your way, or the right way? The Yogyakarta principles: a kenyan interpretation

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Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 2.11 MB
Downloads: 1062

my_way_picture_2Rights Law and the LGBTI Community in Kenya (2010).

An interpretation of how the Yogyakarta principles are applicable in a Kenyan context including case stories of LGBTI people. The GKT (Gay Kenyan trust) has reformulated the legal language of the Yogyakarta principles into a language that is easy for every Kenyan to understand. The result is a simple and clear explanatiion of what LGBTI rights are. That they are neither "Special Rights", nor "New Rights". They are basic human rights. GKT urges the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) to endorse the Yogyakarta Principles and/or this local presentation of the Principles in public forums and to sponsor training and awareness?raising activities.

They want us exterminated. Murder, torture, sexual orientation and gender in Iraq They want us exterminated. Murder, torture, sexual orientation and gender in Iraq

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Date added: 06/07/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 298.31 kB
Downloads: 1062

Human Rights Watch report (2009).

Accoring to Human Rights Watch, the situation for LGBT people in Iraq is very worrying. The report describes how sexual minorities have been further marginalized during the war, especially by the Mahdi army who have killed and tortured LGBT persons. Through interviews with marginalized sexual minoritites HRW documents the problems and stress that the political leaders of Iraq must react to those.

HRW points to the Arab Charter on Human Rights, adopted in 1994 by the Council of the League of Arab States, of which Iraq is a member, which states in article 5 that “Every individual has the right to life, liberty and security of person. These rights shall be protected by law.”

Therefore the Iraqi authorities are obliged not to ignore known threats to the life of people within their jurisdiction, and to take reasonable and appropriate measures to protect LGBT persons. HRW ends the report by listing recommendations to the political leaders and the military.

“These Political Games Ruin Our Lives”: Indonesia’s LGBT Community Under Threat “These Political Games Ruin Our Lives”: Indonesia’s LGBT Community Under Threat

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Date added: 10/06/2017
Date modified: 10/06/2017
Filesize: 5.94 MB
Downloads: 1047

indonesia lgbt0816 reportcover web 1

2016, 91 pages

A 2016 report by Human Rights Watch documents the rise in anti-LGBT rhetoric in Indonesia, as well as the threats and violent attacks on LGBT NGOs, activists, and individuals, primarily by militant Islamists. It includes 70 in-depth interviews with sexual and gender minorities and human rights activists in Jakarta, Yogyakarta, cities in South Sulawesi, cities in Sumatra, and cities in Aceh.

Not dancing to their music: The effects of homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia on the lives of LGBTQ  people in Nigeria Not dancing to their music: The effects of homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia on the lives of LGBTQ people in Nigeria

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Date added: 09/21/2017
Date modified: 09/21/2017
Filesize: 7.58 MB
Downloads: 1037

nigeria

2017, 35 pages

In January 2014, a President Goodluck Jonathan signed the SSMPA (Same Sex Marriage Prohibition Act) in Nigeria.This survey focuses on the personal experiences of the LGBTs in Nigeria by documenting the stigma, shame and sanctions facing LGBT communities across the country and, often, in the diaspora.

Cameroon fact-finding report 2015 Cameroon fact-finding report 2015

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Date added: 06/12/2015
Date modified: 06/12/2015
Filesize: 2.44 MB
Downloads: 1001

Cameroon 2015Februar 2015, 36 pages

This joined report deplore that threats and physical assaults against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersexual (LGBTI) human rights defenders in Cameroon have reached alarming proportions over the last few years.

The testimonies and analyses gathered during the fact-finding mission reflected an environment marked by overall insecurity and intimidation against health rights and LGBTI rights defenders, in a context of criminalisation of homosexuality.

The report is published by The Observatory for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders, (a joint FIDH-OMCT programme), together with MDHC, REDHAC and AMSHeR.

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