Country Reports

Information on the conditions for LGBTI minorities in specific countries from global human rights organizations and other sources.

Documents

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Fremstillinger af seksuelle minoriteter i Ugandas skrevne presse Fremstillinger af seksuelle minoriteter i Ugandas skrevne presse

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Date added: 06/14/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 3.24 MB
Downloads: 1985

Abstract in English: page 159-161. This study (in Danish) examines how sexual minorities are being constructed discursively in the Ugandan English press and how this construction affects social practice (2011).

The starting point for this research has been the Anti?Homosexuality Bill presenting the Ugandan Parliament on October 14, 2009 proposing the death penalty for “aggravated homosexuality”. The bill is part of a social practice in Uganda characterised by widespread poverty, political corruption, strong Christian beliefs and a largely negative attitude towards homosexuality. The critical perspective suggests that the assignment of mainly negative meaningsand mythical representation is articulated and distributed through the English language press in Uganda.

Thus, the study indicates that parts of the discourse practice reaffirms perceptions of sexual minorities dominating the social sphere partly due to structural and social concerns.The study also points to that the mythical representation supports and gives sense to certain actions in the social sphere e.g. The anti?homosexuality bill.

Guilty by Association Guilty by Association

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Date added: 04/11/2013
Date modified: 04/11/2013
Filesize: 770.11 kB
Downloads: 1125

The 55-page report from March 2013 presents 10 case studies of arrests and prosecutions under article 347 bis of Cameroon’s penal code, which punishes “sexual relations between persons of the same sex” with up to five years in prison.

The report found that most people charged with homosexuality are convicted based on little or no evidence. The report includes numerous cases in which the law against homosexual conduct was used for settling scores, showing how the law is easily subject to abuse. Dozens of Cameroonians do jail time solely because they are suspected of being gay or lesbian, the groups found.

Homophobia, Injustice and Corrective Rape in South Africa Homophobia, Injustice and Corrective Rape in South Africa

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Date added: 08/30/2013
Date modified: 08/30/2013
Filesize: 562.95 kB
Downloads: 749

Homophobia SA2013, 30 pages

A detailed discussion of the term corrective rape through an analysis of the narrative of one lesbian's experienced of being raped.

Looking at Sida work in Kenya from a sexuality angle Looking at Sida work in Kenya from a sexuality angle

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Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 375.39 kB
Downloads: 793

An evaluation report on how Sida (Swedish International Development Agency) addresses its commitments related to sexuality in Kenya (2007).

Sida interviewed people who were a part of their development programmes. Page 5 lists the questions asked, with special focus on how taking up a discussion and ensuing actions on sexuality can lead to better programming and eventually improved wellbeing and quality of life. The report also describes how areas which are not obviously connected to sexual rights, such as agriculture and infrastructure, also have taken significant steps to address sexuality issues in relation to HIV/AIDS and gender and other cross cutting issues. The evaluation report ends with a list of recommendations (page 11).

My way, your way, or the right way? The Yogyakarta principles: a kenyan interpretation My way, your way, or the right way? The Yogyakarta principles: a kenyan interpretation

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Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 2.11 MB
Downloads: 548

my_way_picture_2Rights Law and the LGBTI Community in Kenya (2010).

An interpretation of how the Yogyakarta principles are applicable in a Kenyan context including case stories of LGBTI people. The GKT (Gay Kenyan trust) has reformulated the legal language of the Yogyakarta principles into a language that is easy for every Kenyan to understand. The result is a simple and clear explanatiion of what LGBTI rights are. That they are neither "Special Rights", nor "New Rights". They are basic human rights. GKT urges the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) to endorse the Yogyakarta Principles and/or this local presentation of the Principles in public forums and to sponsor training and awareness?raising activities.

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